lollar Coleman Lollar Columns for 1989
WHAT TO KNOW ABOUT COLEMAN
Coleman Lollar died in 1993 at the shockingly young age of 47. But he squeezed a lot of travel and a lot of writing about travel into that much-too-short life. He edited the magazine of the American Society of Travel Agents, was managing editor of Frequent Flyer magazine from 1980 to 1987 and wrote for Travel & Leisure magazine and Frequent Flyer until he died. I worked for him and he worked for me at Frequent Flyer and we worked together at T&L. It was never less than a joy. He was a supple writer with a sharp eye for detail and a real passion for wherever he was visiting. He especially loved Italy. (The Italians, he once told me, were as sophisticated as the French thought they were.) He was always fun. And in his last column for T&L, when he told readers of his impending death, he explained that his only regret was that there were places on the planet he'd never get to visit. -- Joe Brancatelli


December 1: A POUND OF PREVENTION
Some people travel with Valium to alleviate stress. I rely on a sheet of paper. Before each trip I write down numbers—of my bank accounts and charge cards, travelers cheques and passport, key telephones—virtually any number that I might need if my plans change or something goes wrong.

November 15: TWO GENTLY PRICED HOTELS OF VERONA (AND FLORENCE)
Verona is one city in northern Italy where budget travelers can afford to stay in style and in the center of town. Florence, not so much. Here are four hotels in the two cities where you can match value and stylish accommodations.

November 1: THE NEW RULES ON NONREFUNDABLE TICKETS
Daniel F. Matthews Jr. bought six nonrefundable tickets to Florida, then realized he had stipulated the wrong day to begin the family vacation. Matthews asked Northwest Airlines to alter the ticket dates, but the airline refused, claiming the fare Matthews had chosen precluded changes. Instead of going to Florida, Matthews went to court.

October 15: UNTANGLING KIDS’AIRLINE FARES
Airline pricing policies for infants and children are as complicated today as fares for adults. Here are the main points to remember when booking seats.

October 1: HOW TO DRIVE A ONE-WAY CAR-RENTAL BARGAIN
On a flight to Denver I met a couple from Switzerland on their way to see the American West. They planned to pick up a rental car in Denver, spend a week driving through the Rockies and the desert, visit Las Vegas, then drop the car off at San Francisco Airport and fly home. I wondered how much their one-way rental had cost.

September 15: AIRPORT CLUBS ARE WORTH THE MONEY
Sequestered behind those dark wooden doors along airport corridors, airline club lounges are primarily the domain of expense-account travelers. But even if you take just three or four flights a year at your own expense you might find a membership worth the money.

September 1: AROUND-THE-WORLD FARES: GRAND TOUR FOR TWO GRAND
A trip around the world might sound impossibly expensive, but you can buy an around-the-word excursion ticket for about $2,000 and book the entire trip with one phone call. You’ll have up to a year to complete the circuit, and along the way you can make as many stopovers as you wish.

August 15: THE FINANCIAL PERIL OF PHONING HOME
Hotels have reaped a nifty benefit from telephone deregulation: They are free to contract with independent long-distance carriers that charge rates up to five times as high as those of AT&T, and then share the spoils. With a little planning you can still outwit hotels, but the strategy you used in the past might no longer do the job.

August 1: (SOME) ROOMS WITH A VIEW IN FLORENCE
E.M. Forster misled us: relatively few rooms in Florence have views. A charmed cityscape of narrow streets and buildings that rarely rise more than five stories sees to that. But with many hotels in former palazzo or villas, it’s easy to find a room with a past—without spending a fortune.

These columns originally appeared in Travel & Leisure magazine.

Copyright © 1989 by Coleman Lollar. All rights reserved.